Journalism

This Mailbox Pantry In Hill East Is Trying To Make A Dent In Neighborhood Food Insecurity | DCist

It’s also how one resident hopes to preserve a family legacy.

Day centers put vital services for people experiencing homelessness in one place

People experiencing homelessness often have no place to go during the day, and figuring out where to find a meal, get an ID card, do laundry, and get started on the journey to finding a home takes a lot of effort and coordination. Day centers can help.

Ward 8 residents fight invasive species, litter, and discrimination to keep their woods alive

It’s 10:29 am on a Friday in October. Nathan Harrington, founder of Ward 8 Woods, a local DC nonprofit that aims to clean up the forests in Anacostia, has just finished staking a sign onto the side of the road that says, “Your Litter Hits Close To Home.”

Why do homeless encampments persist? Unsheltered people weigh in.

The underpasses at K, L, and M Streets in the NoMa area of Northeast DC give off an unpleasant odor. Put bluntly, they reek of urine. And the rotting piles of garbage strewn up and down their sidewalks do little to mask the smell.

Recovering from trauma of an encampment clean-up | Street Sense Media

This article was featured in the April 29 digital-only edition of Street Sense. Until it is safe to resume person-to-person sales, you’ll always be able to find the current digital-only edition at streetsensemedia.org/Digital Thank you for reading! Please continue to support our vendors through our mobile app (streetsensemedia.org/App).

When an encampment is a single person and their stuff | Street Sense Media

On a recent morning, a man pushed a metal cart northward along the intersection of 16 th and K streets NW. Pedestrians shuffled past him talking on their phones. Red city taxis idled near The Capital Hilton waiting to ferry guests.

Interfaith service held for those who died without a home | Street Sense Media

Around 50 people gathered inside of New York Avenue Presbyterian Church on Friday, Dec. 20, in honor of National Homeless Person’s Memorial Day. The service was just one part of a series of events taking place in over 180 cities to remember those who had passed away during the year while experiencing homelessness.

As the need for healthy food grows, urban gardeners step up

Dr. Kate Tully researches food security at the University of Maryland, and moonlights as an urban farmer at a Northwest DC community garden called Columbia Heights Green. The farm, which is funded by the non-profit Washington Parks and People, usually provides between 20-50% of its annual yield to local charities.

Activists march to remember 117 people who died without homes in DC | Street Sense Media

At 5 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, an assembly gathered inside Luther Place Church, located on 14th St NW north of Thomas Circle, to commemorate the lives of 81 people who died without homes last year.

Our local governments are fighting harmful litter. Here’s how.

When people litter, their trash regularly makes its way from sidewalks and ditches into waterways, where it eventually begins to break down. The resulting microplastics leach harmful chemicals which can sicken, alter, or kill aquatic creatures, which can in turn cause negative ripple effects for other animals and humans alike.

Illegal dumping is a big problem in our region. Here’s how local jurisdictions are tackling it.

Tires, construction debris, furniture-these are among the many things people illegally dump in alleys, roadsides, and other secluded areas all over the Washington region. Local governmental agencies are working together to stop the dumping, and ultimately to curb the environmental damage it causes.

By 2025, we could fish and swim in the once notoriously-polluted Anacostia River

Hundreds of years ago, people could fish and swim in the Anacostia River without worry, but over time it became so polluted that the prospect of swimming or eating anything from it became absurd. The work of local governments and nonprofits, however, has catapulted this idea out from the absurd straight back into the realms of possibility.

DC is trying to get food waste out of the landfill and back into the soil

DC is trying to reduce the amount of food waste that ends up in landfills and help residents compost it instead so it can enrich the soil instead of being trapped in a landfill.

Many of DC’s playground surfaces contain lead. How dangerous is this, and what should be done?

There is lead – according to four DC agencies, reaching “actionable levels” – on the surfaces of at least 17 DC playgrounds. This, understandably, has alarmed many parents and residents already concerned about reports about lead on play surfaces that come from rubber.


California’s ‘Fair Pay to Play’ Law Sparks Praise, Criticism

A new bill signed by the governor of California promises to significantly alter the way college athletes are compensated, and how colleges and universities derive income from the athletes and the schools’ athletic programs. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill 206, also known as the “Fair Pay to Play Act,” into law Monday but the new legislation won’t take effect until Jan.

What is so complicated about homeless encampments in DC? | Street Sense Media

This article is part of our 2019 contribution to the DC Homeless Crisis Reporting Project in collaboration with other local newsrooms. You can see all of our collective work published throughout the day at DCHomelessCrisis.press and join the public Facebook group to discuss how to act on this information and add context to areas we may have overlooked.

The summer heat can be deadly for unsheltered people. Here’s how you can help.

Washington, DC is one of the most intense summer “heat islands” of any US city. Temperatures during the summer can soar 21 degrees higher than surrounding rural areas, according to a report by Climate Central. And the population at greatest risk of suffering from heat-related illnesses in the summer is people experiencing homelessness.

Why some homeowners oppose the city’s plan for a new shelter | Street Sense Media

This article is part of our 2019 contribution to the DC Homeless Crisis Reporting Project in collaboration with other local newsrooms. You can see all of our collective work published throughout the day at DCHomelessCrisis.press and join the public Facebook group to discuss how to act on this information and add context to areas we may have overlooked.

Obituary: Michael Irby of Washington D.C. | Street Sense Media

Michael Irby of Washington, D.C., passed away in the early morning of July 26. He was 65 years old. He was preceded in death by his wife, Joyce Irby, who passed away on August 5, 2018. Michael is survived by his brother Shawn Irby and his sister Celeste Irby, as well as his daughter Mikka Irby of North Carolina.

How cool indifference magnifies the summer heat | Street Sense Media

Washington D.C. is one of the most intense summer “heat islands” of any U.S. city. Temperatures during the summer can soar 21 degrees higher than surrounding rural areas, according to a report by Climate Central. And the population at greatest risk of suffering from heat-related illnesses in the summer is people experiencing homelessness.

Re-framing the District’s shelter meal debate | Street Sense Media

There are 42 different listings for shelters on the D.C. Department of Human Services webpage . These listings are divided into four categories: family transitional housing, family year-round temporary shelters, single adult shelters, and transitional supportive housing. The District’s choice of shelter food is one that affects all 5,900 people that stay in them.

DC Council FY20 budget adds some funds for housing and UMC | Street Sense Media

When it comes to the fiscal year 2020 budget, one thing is clear: The D.C. Council knows how to compromise. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson’s amendment to the budget to increase funding for the United Medical Center and to restore limited funding to the previously cut Affordable Housing Preservation Fund seemed to allay the concerns of most everyone present in the council chambers for the second vote on the city budget on May 28.

A group of farmers, restaurants, and businesses team up to provide food to those in need

In response to a food chain left broken by the coronavirus pandemic, a group of 25 organizations including restaurants, food pantries, and farms are working to keep restaurant workers employed, food pantries stocked, and people fed.

How climate change and COVID-19 are threatening your beloved IPA

Brewers today are faced with two crises, COVID-19 and climate change, that are affecting the way beer is being consumed, valued, and produced. The crisis pose particular threats to smaller manufacturers who must find ways to be sustainable and resilient while ensuring that they still turn a profit.

This environmental group from Ward 8 has found a new way to serve their community

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, Ward 8 Woods, a local DC non-profit charged with cleaning the forests in Ward 8, had to find a new way to do their work.